#OrganicClimateSolutions

Greenlander! Expanding the Use of Cover Crops in Organic Vegetable Farming

Though it may seem laborious to grow plants that will never be harvested, cover crops can bring many benefits to Canadian farmers. At the EFAO conference’s webinar: Greenlander! Expanding the use of cover crops in organic vegetable farming, cover crop farmers and experts Jeff Boesch from Cedar Down Farm and Reid Allaway from Tourne-Sol Co-operative Farm shared insights drawn from years of experience with cover cropping.

Reducing On-Farm Emissions and Energy Use

Climate change and agriculture are closely connected. Agriculture makes up 10 percent of greenhouse gas emissions in Canada, excluding on-farm fossil fuel usage and fertilizer production processes. Canada has pledged to lower greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions across the economy by 40 percent and reduce agricultural emissions by 30 percent from 2020 levels by 2030. In order to meet these targets, changes across the agricultural industry are necessary.

On-Farm Natural Habitats: What They Are and Why They Matter

With so many external stressors threatening our natural ecosystems, some farmers have turned to rebuilding or preserving natural spaces on their farmland. If done correctly, this practice can prove enormously beneficial to the farm and its surrounding environment. So what kinds of natural landscapes can farmers rebuild, and what kind of care will these new spaces require?

Small Grain Buyers Meet and Greet

Grains are extremely valuable to organic farmers—they can serve as a main crop, as feed or as a cover crop to reduce weeds and build soil health. At the EFAO conference’s Grain Buyers Meet and Greet, sponsored by the Organic Council of Ontario, organic small grain growers from across Ontario’s organic sector had the opportunity  to network and address some of the most common questions and concerns regarding small grain production and marketing.

Ecological Innovations On Regenerative and Organic Farms

Each organic or regenerative farm is as unique as the farmers who keep it running, especially when it comes to dealing with organic agriculture’s most infamous challenge: weeds. Read on to learn how five organic Ontario-based farmers and researchers use different approaches to achieve this goal in weed management.